Feb. 23, 2012

Reception exercise welcomes hundreds to Fort Pickett

By Cotton Puryear
Virginia Department of Military Affairs

FORT PICKETT, Va. — More than 700 Canadian Army Reserve, active duty U. S. Army and Army National Guard personnel were welcomed to Fort Pickett Feb. 18 as the installation conducted a reception exercise for units participating in Exercise Southbound Trooper. Formally known as the Joint Reception, Staging, Onward Movement, and Integration, or JRSOI, the process makes sure that proper accountability of personnel and equipment is established when additional forces came into the state, as well as assessing any training and logistical needs for the units.

 

More than 700 Canadian Army Reserve, active duty U.S. Army and Army National Guard personnel were welcomed to Fort Pickett Feb. 18 as the installation conducted a reception exercise for units participating in Exercise Southbound Trooper. Formally known as the Joint Reception, Staging, Onward Movement, and Integration, or JRSOI, the process makes sure that proper accountability of personnel and equipment is established when additional forces came into the state, as well as assessing any training and logistical needs for the units. (Photo by Cotton Puryear, Virginia Department of Military Affairs)

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Welcoming units to Fort Pickett is a regular occurrence for an installation where thousands of troops train each year, but this exercise was on a larger scale and was more detailed, explained Col. Tom Wilkinson, commander of Fort Pickett.

“We are receiving everyone and making sure they have all the proper paperwork like passports and next of kin notification,” he explained. After the inprocessing, personnel were assigned barracks and then were scheduled to receive briefings about Fort Pickett and the installation’s key rules and regulations.

One key aspect of the exercise was having Fort Pickett personnel specialists working side by side with personnel specialists from the incoming units. This approach made the process much smoother, Wilkinson said.

The Canadians provided a checklist of what specific things needed to be verified during the inprocessing, and that system would be used in any situation where a JRSOI was conducted for incoming units.

In a domestic response situation, personnel might be required to have certain training like firefighting, less than lethal engagement techniques or rules for the use of force, explained Lt. Col. Jim Contreras, who serves as Fort Pickett’s director of plans, training and security as a traditional Guardsman. As personnel were inprocessed, requirements would be validated and those that needed training to be validated on certain tasks would conduct that training before they could move on to their assigned mission.

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